How the EU’s Copyright Filters Will Make it Trivial For Anyone to Censor the Internet

On Wednesday, the EU will vote on whether to accept two controversial proposals in the new Copyright Directive; one of these clauses, Article 13, has the potential to allow anyone, anywhere in the world, to effect mass, rolling waves of censorship across the Internet.
The way things stand today, companies that let their users communicate in public (by posting videos, text, images, etc) are required to respond to claims of copyright infringement by removing their users’ posts, unless the user steps up to contest the notice. Sites can choose not to remove work if they think the copyright claims are bogus, but…

How the EU’s Copyright Filters Will Make it Trivial For Anyone to Censor the Internet

Google’s Leadership Still Needs To Give Details About Project Dragonfly: Googlers Can Still Help

Earlier this week, we joined with Human Rights Watch, Amnesty International, Article 19, and 10 other international human rights groups in a letter to Google’s senior leadership, calling on the company to come clean on its intentions in China – both to the public, and within the company.
A little background: it’s been almost a month since The Intercept first broke the story that Google was planning to release a censored version of its search service inside China. Since that time, very little new information about the effort, known as Project Dragonfly, has come to light. Over 1,400 employees have asked Google…

Google’s Leadership Still Needs To Give Details About Project Dragonfly: Googlers Can Still Help